<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, May 8, 2013 at 9:13 PM, Owen Anderson <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:resistor@mac.com" target="_blank" class="cremed">resistor@mac.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im"><div><div>On May 8, 2013, at 10:50 AM, Chandler Carruth <<a href="mailto:chandlerc@google.com" target="_blank" class="cremed">chandlerc@google.com</a>> wrote:</div>
<br><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>

<div>¬†</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
What are the SHA-3 variants that you think would suite these needs ?</blockquote></div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I want to look at the implementation complexity. The winner (and the official SHA3 algorithm), BMW and Skein are all worth looking at.</div>
</div></div></div></blockquote><br></div></div><div>If your primary criterion is through-put on large, desktop-class CPUs, Skein is likely to be the winner. ¬†Keccak (the official SHA3) is also pretty fast on CPUs (and significantly better in hardware implementations, not that it matters here), and has the advantage of having the official designation.</div>
</blockquote></div><br>I was moderately certain that BMW had a significantly higher throughput in software, and was only disqualified due to fairly long-tail security concerns that wouldn't apply here.</div></div>